Daniel Strand

Daniel Strand

Daniel Strand is a professor who teaches courses on the just war tradition, ethics and leadership, and contemporary political ethics. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Arizona State University (2015-19) in the History Department and the Program in Political History and Leadership. Strand’s research interests include the political and moral theology of Augustine of Hippo and the Augustinian tradition, ethics and foreign policy, the just war tradition, bioethics, and moral theory. He is the author of the forthcoming Gods of the Nations (Cambridge University Press), a historical study of Augustine’s political theology in The City of God. He has published articles and book chapters on Augustine of Hippo, Hannah Arendt, and the ethics of euthanasia. He is a contributing editor at Providence. He received his BA from the University of Minnesota, MDiv from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, and PhD in religion and ethics from the University of Chicago.

The “Death” of the European-American Relationship

If Brooks and others who are deeply unnerved by Trump aren’t careful, their warnings of destruction and doom can actually feed the fires of doom and gloom.

Trump's Long Strange Trip
Trump’s Long, Strange Trip

Trump’s recent trip to Brussels, the UK, and Helsinki for the now infamous Putin summit has the president appearing in a different light

To Change the World: A Long View
To Change the World: A Long View

Ideas are not enough. Teaching in a history department these past couple years has convinced me that ideas are often not the driving force behind great changes in society and world events. Philosophers, theologians, and intellectuals of all sorts often act like the only thing that matters are ideas. You get the ideas right and then you change the world. Evangelicals are notorious for this kind of thinking.

The Great Good of Order: A Partial Defense of Jeff Sessions
The Great Good of Order: A Partial Defense of Jeff Sessions

Most Christians, including most evangelicals, have been falling over themselves to denounce Jeff Sessions. But the way this immigration debate is carried out too often mirrors the political debate.

Is the Nation-State Fading?
Is the Nation-State Fading?

The current nationalist fervor could actually be a sign of nation-states’ weakness, a gasp that belies a lack of confidence in it as a form of government that can adequately represent a people and govern them fairly.

The American Condition: A Reflection on Cosmopolitanism and Community
The American Condition: A Reflection on Cosmopolitanism and Community

Cosmopolitanism can be a particularly pernicious temptation because it invites us to love the idealized reality of humanity above our actual flesh and blood neighbors who live next door.

Consistently Inconsistent: Haspel’s Appointment Exposes Disingenuous Democrats
Consistently Inconsistent: Haspel’s Appointment Exposes Disingenuous Democrats

John Brennan, who could be credibly blamed as one of the waterboarding program’s chief supporters, seems to escape with little to no blame, while Gina Haspel, who was carrying out the orders of her higher-ups, gets accused of moral impropriety because she was tasked with implementing their plan.

Where is the Love: Do Reformed Christians Really Love Israel?

Reflecting on Israel at its seventieth anniversary, I wonder why Reformed Christians, or Calvinists as they are sometimes called, are more reluctant and timid about their views on Israel. 

Religious Left Misdiagnoses Crisis of Evangelicalism - Donald Trump - Power
Religious Left Misdiagnoses Crisis of Evangelicalism

The long history of Christian reflection does not share Mark Labberton’s confidence that “God so loved the world” means the rejection of power and worldly politics.

The Delightful Heresy of Jacksonianism
The Delightful Heresy of Jacksonianism

Christians should remember this: any political theology that treats its own people as a divinely chosen political community treads on heretical soil.