Marc LiVecche

Marc LiVecche is the executive editor of Providence. He serves as the Class of 1958 Fellow at the Stockdale Center for Ethical Leadership at the US Naval Academy. From the summer of 2018 to fall of 2020, he was the McDonald Research Scholar at the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, & Public Life, in residence at Christ Church, Oxford University.

Marc completed doctoral studies, earning distinction, at the University of Chicago, where he worked under the supervision of the political theorist and public intellectual Jean Bethke Elshtain, until her death in August, 2013. His first book, The Good Kill: Just War & Moral Injury, will be published in early 2021 by Oxford University Press. Another project, Responsibility and Restraint: James Turner Johnson and the Just War Tradition, co-edited with Eric Patterson, was published by Stone Tower Press in the fall of 2020. Currently, he is finalizing Moral Horror: A Just War Defense of Hiroshima. Before all this academic stuff, Marc spent twelve years doing a variety of things in Central Europe—ranging from helping build sport and recreational leagues in post-communist communities, to working at a Christian study and research center, to leading seminars on history and ethics onsite at the former Auschwitz-Birkenau Nazi concentration camp in Poland. This latter experience allowed him to continue his undergraduate study of the Shoah; a process which rendered him entirely ill-suited for pacifism.

Marc lives in Annapolis, Maryland with his wife and children–and a marmota monax whistlepigging under the shed. He can be followed, or stalked, on twitter @mlivecche. Additional publications can be found at his Amazon author page.

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Marksism — No. 49: Jesus & Hamas, New Whiggery, & Iraq War

Today we’re covering three scintillating pieces from Providence this week, one on the Israel and Hamas conflict, another on a new book about the Iraq War, and thirdly, one by yours truly on the New Whiggery.

Israel Gaza war
Proportionality and the Israel-Hamas Conflict

For proportionality to remain a helpful category in limiting the horrors of war, it needs to remain a calculation of costs against effects—measuring the goods to be achieved by two measures of harms, including that which will be likely done if force is not used,

kavod good friday weight glory
The Holy Week Reader: Kavod! Good Friday & The Weight of Glory

Peter Paul Ruben’s extraordinary “Raising of the Cross” helps reflect on Divine love, human flourishing, and the weight of glory.

go and do likewise, violence sacrifice jesus easter
The Holy Week Reader: Go and Do Likewise

Maundy Thursday has much to say both about the location of human flourishing and the role violence might play in it.

Judas' betrayal of Jesus shows that Divine love is willing to give human beings despite the risks, because love must be free
The Holy Week Reader: Volo Ut Sis

Christ’s treatment of Judas, despite his betrayal, illustrates the Divine Love that was willing to bring human beings into being despite the risks. Because that’s what love does.

the second temple destruction on passover
The Holy Week Reader: Living Faithfully Under Sentence of Death

Holy Tuesday is about preparation, endurance, and hope despite the grim realities around us. In the face of the certainty of death, we are shown how best to live.

Was Jesus a Pacifist?
The Holy Week Reader: Monday — A Savior Who Overturns Tables

The cleansing of the temple reveals the character of our Messiah and is a model for those who would follow him.

Palm Sunday Jesus triumphal entry
A Tale of Two Cities: What the Cross of Christ Did (And Didn’t Do)

The Holy Week Reader: Palm Sunday witnessed the rise of two cities in the world of humanity. Christians are citizens of both. Attendant responsibilities follow.

Bortchen: On Family, Character Education, & Middle Earth

The family is essential to the spiritual health of the nation: reflections on character, kingdoms, and hope

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Bortchen: Grey Zones, Living Like Lions, & Inspector Javert

Observations about hostilities short of war, Once An Eagle and the importance of duty, and what Inspector Javert can teach us about moral injury and right belief