Marc LiVecche

Marc LiVecche is the executive editor of Providence. He is also Scholar of Christian Ethics, War, & Peace at the Institute on Religion & Democracy and a research scholar at Philos Project. From the summer of 2017 to fall of 2020, he is serving as the McDonald Visiting Scholar at the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, & Public Life at Christ Church, Oxford University. While there, he is working on a number of publishing projects, including a book-length argument for the morality of the bombing of Hiroshima.

Prior to these roles, he completed doctoral studies at the University of Chicago, where he worked under the supervision of the political theorist and public intellectual Jean Bethke Elshtain, until her death in August, 2013. Marc’s dissertation, With Malice Toward None: The Moral Ground for Killing in War, takes a classic just war view of the question of killing in its theological and ethical dimensions in part as a response to the crisis of moral injury. Before all that, Marc spent twelve years doing a variety of things in Central Europe—ranging from helping build sport and recreational leagues in post-communist communities, to working at a Christian study and research center, to leading seminars on history and ethics onsite at the former Auschwitz-Birkenau Nazi concentration camp in Poland. This latter experience allowed him to continue his undergraduate study of the Shoah; a process which helped permanently inoculate him against pacifism.

Soldiers approaching Omaha during the Normandy invasion.
War Is Not Hell

God can be loved and worshipped on the battlefield, and pacifism as opposed to soldiering stands as an exception to the Christian norm.

Reception_of_Jews_in_Poland_1096
A Missed Opportunity

The recent surge in interest in moral injury has been largely motivated by psychiatric battle casualties suffered in Iraq and Afghanistan, but of course combat veterans throughout history have staggered home suffering not necessarily from physical injuries as classically perceived but injured all the same.

Uncle Sam Waterboarding
Always Wrong?

In the just war tradition, war (and therefore torture) are not only sometimes morally permissible but obligatory in order to restrain the enemy from sin.

2012 Giro d'Italia
Case Reasoning (& Wheel Changes)

A look at the Giro d’Italia and how exceptionless rules are also essential to bicycle races – as like perhaps to moral reasoning.

Pope Francis
Merchants of Death?

The headlines are exasperating, if a bit hyperbolic: Reuters writes, “Pope Says Weapons Manufacturers Can’t Call Themselves Christians” while the Daily Beast puts it, “Pope: Gun Makers Are Not Christians.”

Flags at Arlington National Cemetery.
Remembering Not To Forget

Reflections on how people choose to spend Memorial Day and how this relates to Christian pacifism.