Mark Melton

Mark Melton is the managing editor for Providence and was the journal’s inaugural deputy editor. He earned his master’s degree in international relations from the University of St. Andrews, and his bachelor’s degree in foreign language and international trade comes from Mississippi College. Prior to moving to DC, he worked as a political science adjunct professor at community colleges in Mississippi and taught English in France.

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Sympathy for Nationalists, but Little Hope: A Review of Samuel Goldman’s After Nationalism
Sympathy for Nationalists, but Little Hope: A Review of Samuel Goldman’s After Nationalism

Goldman responds to commentators who believe that Americans must return to some overarching identity and purpose. He argues that this task is difficult when the conditions that allowed previous unity no longer exist. Moreover, nationalists do not reasonably explain programs that could reignite a meaningful shared identity.

Global Generosity and “Being Played for Suckers”
Global Generosity and “Being Played for Suckers”

In this article originally published by Christianity and Crisis on March 18, 1946, Charles W. Gilkey warns Americans not to worry that helping people abroad will make them “suckers.”

World Community and World Government: What Reinhold Niebuhr Said
World Community and the Folly of World Government: What Reinhold Niebuhr Said

“A Christian knows, or ought to know, that an adequate Christian political ethic is not established merely by conceiving the most ideal possible solution for a political problem. He must, in all humility, deal with the realities of human nature, as well as the ideal possibilities.”

Geopolitical Conflict with China Hits Fashion Industry
Cold War with China Hits Fashion Industry during H&M Boycott

State broadcasters called upon the Chinese people to boycott companies that did not use Xinjiang cotton. Reports found forced labor likely make this product.

“The United Nations—Its Challenge to America,” by John Foster Dulles
The United Nations — Its Challenge to America

Published in Christianity and Crisis 75 years ago on March 18, 1946, the speech offers the future Secretary of State Dulles’ insights and recommendations for how the United States should utilize the newly established United Nations. Readers today can learn from how the great statesman saw the world as it dragged itself out of the ruins of a total war.

Unpunished Murder in Northern Ireland Remembered: A Review of Patrick Radden Keefe’s Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland
Unpunished Murder in Northern Ireland Remembered: A Review of Patrick Radden Keefe’s Say Nothing

Numbers and statistics can desensitize students of war to real tragedy. But Keefe’s focus on Jean McConville’s murder in Say Nothing gives readers a detailed examination of the Troubles while reminding them of the victims.

Two Tasks after the Insurrection at the US Capitol
Two Tasks after the Insurrection at the US Capitol

The insurrection on Epiphany reveals essential tasks—for America to prevent another attack and for the church to respond properly to the misuse of its symbols.

The Vengeance of Victors
The Vengeance of Victors

There is no more dismal aspect of human history than the behavior of victors. However just their cause, they never fail to cast doubt upon its righteousness by the manner in which they exploit their victory.

State Privilege Won’t Save a Faith

Proponents of religious economy theory point to evidence suggesting that religious adherence decreases when a government actively promotes a church or hinders other beliefs.

The Chaplain Can Teach the Church
The Chaplain Can Teach the Church

“There is much for the chaplain to teach the church, as well as much instruction to be received from the church.”