Book Review

The Top 5 Books on American Foreign Policy
The Top 5 Books on American Foreign Policy

Here are some of the top books to help you understand the history of American foreign policy.

“Be Joyful, the Shield and Protection of our Fatherland”: Russian Nuclear Orthodoxy in the Age of St. Seraphim - Book Review Dmitry Adamsky
“Be Joyful, the Shield and Protection of our Fatherland”: Russian Nuclear Orthodoxy in the Age of St. Seraphim

Dmitry Adamsky’s outstanding Russian Nuclear Orthodoxy explains the religious imagination that has swept not only through the Russian nuclear arsenal since 1991, but also into all levels of the country’s nuclear tirade, military forces, and even Russian foreign policy more broadly.

Cold War Lessons for Today
Cold War Lessons for Today

As we look out at the world today, Americans need to recount the lessons of the Cold War that Gaddis helpfully brings to our attention.

Abraham Kuyper’s Christian Advice for Foreign Policy
Abraham Kuyper’s Christian Advice for Foreign Policy

For Kuyper, governance is an opportunity to plant Christian truth in another part of the world’s soil. It is about giving others a chance to flourish.

Ancient Tragedy Returns to Foreign Policy: Book Review of Hal Brands and Charles Edel The Lessons of Tragedy
Ancient Tragedy Returns to Foreign Policy: Review of Brands and Edel’s The Lessons of Tragedy

Did the American people lose their sense of tragedy after the Soviet Union fell, or is something else afoot?

Why Russia Didn’t Collapse Like Venezuela… For Now - Book Review of Chris Miller’s Putinomics: Power and Money in Resurgent Russia
Why Russia Didn’t Collapse Like Venezuela… For Now: Review of Miller’s Putinomics

Putin’s Russia still has numerous challenges today from corruption to slow economic growth, but Chris Miller argues in Putinomics that the federation should be compared to fellow petrostate Venezuela since both were similar in the late 1990s.

From the Trenches to the Shire & Narnia: Review of Joseph Loconte’s A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War
From the Trenches to the Shire and Narnia: Review of Loconte’s A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War

While Lewis and Tolkien’s faith and contributions are well-known, most do not realize they both fought in the First World War as young men. Even fewer recognize how their time in the western front’s trenches influenced their faith and later works. However, in A Hobbit, A Wardrobe, and a Great War, Providence senior editor Joseph Loconte explains in his typical, approachable prose how the war affected these two men deeply and how those experiences influenced their writings and faith.

Does Scripture Really Require Nation-States? Review of Hazony’s The Virtue of Nationalism
Does Scripture Really Require Nation-States? Review of Hazony’s The Virtue of Nationalism

If we follow scripture as understood by Hazony, perhaps then we face his “either nation or empire” mentality. From other Christian perspectives, an appeal could be made to the varying levels of political organization available to polities over time, ranging from the city to the nation-state, to regional federations, and so on. Hazony’s account, however, allows no such appeal.

The Gentle Shape of Deceit: Eisenhower's Rhetoric in Randy Fowler More Than a Doctrine - Book Review
The Gentle Shape of Deceit: Eisenhower’s Rhetoric in Fowler’s More Than a Doctrine

In More Than a Doctrine, Randy Fowler argues that, even though President Eisenhower didn’t have a reputation for being a powerful orator, his speeches had a profound effect on the Middle East.