Book Review

Moby Dick was Framed!
Moby Dick was Framed!

One of the most stunning revelations of “In the Heart of the Sea” by Nathaniel Philbrick was the witness reports of the sperm whale’s attack on the Essex, which is assumed to have inspired the book Moby Dick.

Cities of Men and Architecture of God: A Review of Philip Bess’ Till We Have Built Jerusalem
Cities of Men and Architecture of God: A Review of Philip Bess’ Till We Have Built Jerusalem

Till We Have Built Jerusalem is a challenging book for daring to discuss the connection between ethics and aesthetic theories of architecture and urban design, what Bess calls our “built environment.”

Behind the Scenes of Global Human Rights: A Review of Tistounet’s The UN Human Rights Council: A Practical Anatomy
Behind the Scenes of Global Human Rights: A Review of Tistounet’s The UN Human Rights Council

Eric Tistounet’s book The UN Human Rights Council: A Practical Anatomy adds to our understanding of United Nations bodies and how human rights are addressed within this multilateral institution.

Christianity’s Meritocratic Dilemma: Reflections on Sandel’s The Tyranny of Merit
Christianity’s Meritocratic Dilemma: Reflections on Sandel’s The Tyranny of Merit

Michael Sandel’s “The Tyranny of Merit” is an invitation to rethink a seemingly self-evident thought, that our social and economic position should be dictated solely by whether we deserve to have that position.

The Civil War Offers Public Diplomacy Lessons: A Review of Doyle’s The Cause of All Nations
The Civil War Offers Public Diplomacy Lessons: A Review of Doyle’s The Cause of All Nations

While most histories of the Civil War naturally focus on the drama in America, Don H. Doyle’s “The Cause of All Nations” explains how the conflict fits into broader world history and how events abroad affected the war.

From Hell to Humanity, and American Attitudes Toward War: A Review of Samuel Moyn’s Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War
From Hell to Humanity, and American Attitudes Toward War: A Review of Samuel Moyn’s Humane

In “Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War,” Samuel Moyn forces readers to ask whether America’s shift toward “humane” war has a dark side.

First Mennonite Church in Berne, Indiana, in May 2007. By OZinOH, via Flickr.
A New Mennonite Vision: A Review of Melissa Florer-Bixler’s How to Have an Enemy

Melissa Florer-Bixler is angry, and she wants her fellow Mennonites to get angry, too. At least, that is the professed premise of her book, “How to Have an Enemy: Righteous Anger and the Work of Peace.”

The Religion of John Foster Dulles: A Review of Wilsey’s God’s Cold Warrior
The Religion of John Foster Dulles: A Review of Wilsey’s God’s Cold Warrior

John Wilsey’s new book “God’s Cold Warrior” is the only full-life biography of John Foster Dulles that thoroughly investigates his religious life and the ways his faith influenced his professional and personal lives.

Red and Blue Christian Disunity: A Review of Yancey and Quosigk’s One Faith No Longer
Red and Blue Christian Disunity: A Review of Yancey and Quosigk’s One Faith No Longer

George Yancey and Ashlee Quosigk argue in “One Faith No Longer: The Transformation of Christianity in Red and Blue America” that the gulf between progressive and conservative Christianity is so great they are no longer the same faith.