Just War Tradition

The Cost of Responsibility

This is not a blog about Sweden, but much of it will seem like it is. Recent Nordic events certainly warrant comment. Mirroring the larger European mood, Sweden, perhaps particularly so, is suffering some loss of confidence in the endurance of her own sovereignty. In an opinion piece in Sweden’s Svenska Dagbladet newspaper, the leadership of the influential Center Party neatly summarizes the reason, “We lack the ability to defend ourselves.”

Test Baker marked the first-ever underwater nuclear explosion when the 23 kiloton device was detonated on July 25, 1946.
Thinking About the Unthinkable

It was a terrible anniversary. Seventy years ago this past week, at zero eight fifteen hours, August 6th, 1945, the Enola Gay, a U.S. Army Air Force B-29, dropped an 8,900-pound bomb, dubbed “Little Boy”, over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Three days later a second bomb, Fat Man, fell upon Nagasaki.

Soldiers approaching Omaha during the Normandy invasion.
War Is Not Hell

God can be loved and worshipped on the battlefield, and pacifism as opposed to soldiering stands as an exception to the Christian norm.

Uncle Sam Waterboarding
Always Wrong?

In the just war tradition, war (and therefore torture) are not only sometimes morally permissible but obligatory in order to restrain the enemy from sin.