War

The Crucible of Hell: A Conversation with Saul David
The Crucible of Hell: A Conversation with Saul David

Writing about his experience in the Battle of Okinawa, US Marine Eugene Sledge reported that “men struggled and fought and…

The Last Lion Snarled: Three Scenes from the Olympian Life of Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill was no perfect man. But in this week, the eightieth anniversary of the beginning of his prime ministerial effort to save Britain particularly and Western civilization generally, we speak peace to his ashes and honor to his memory.

Victory in Europe Day & Human Equality

Today is the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, so it’s appropriate that I’m reading about one of its…

V-E Day and the American Profession of Arms: A Conversation with Col. Mallard

On this V-E Day, Marc LiVecche connected with Col. Timothy Mallard, Command Chaplain for U.S. Army Europe, to discuss the…

Soberness in Victory: A Reflection on V-E Day from 75 Years Ago

On May 8, 1945, the Allies accepted Nazi Germany’s unconditional surrender. Shortly thereafter, Reinhold Niebuhr explained why the victors should be sober and humble.

Keep Your Eyes on the Trees: An Essay on 1917, the Most Profound Film Since Tree of Life
Keep Your Eyes on the Trees: An Essay on 1917, the Most Profound Film Since Tree of Life

1917 certainly is not a “one trick” movie, nor is it “soulless” or “bad” or “bombast” or a mere slice of cake. No, it is a work of art. It is a beautiful film. It is a deceptively deep inquiry into the value of life, the treasured heritage of Western civilization, and the importance of martial courage.

Christian Realism and Fires that Won’t Go Away: A Book Review of William Brodrick A Whispered Name
Christian Realism and Fires that Won’t Go Away: A Review of William Brodrick’s A Whispered Name

William Brodrick’s “A Whispered Name” is a lyrical reflection on responsibility, judgment, grief, the elusiveness of justice, reconciliation, and human longing.

Reinhold Niebuhr and the Second World War

Beginning in 1940, Reinhold Niebuhr made the case for a sober, realistic, and morally grounded US involvement overseas, out of the central admission that whatever America’s own faults, a punctilious detachment from world affairs might very well result in the triumph of greater imbalances and injustices

Why Americans Should Critique Their Government, Even When Others Are Worse

Christianity and Crisis published the following editorial by Reinhold Niebuhr on February 19, 1945. He explains not only why his publication criticized the United States’ foreign policies as the country fought Nazi Germany, but also why Christians should not have uncritical loyalty to the nation.