ProvCast Ep. 9: European Integration and the Church

& Mark Melton | April 18, 2017

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ProvCast Episode 9: European Integration and the Church

In this episode we speak with Mark Royce about the Church’s role in the European integration project that has developed into the European Union. As part of his doctoral dissertation, Royce examined how the historic influence of the Roman Catholic Church and various Protestant denominations in Europe helped some countries accept integration while others resisted.

Mark Royce currently teaches political science at George Mason University and NVCC Annandale. He has written previously for Providence as well as for The European LegacyInternational & Comparative Law Quarterly, and the Journal of Church & State.

When we first recorded this podcast late last summer, Palgrave Macmillan was considering Royce’s dissertation for publication. I am happy to report that it was accepted and will be released in June of this year under the title The Political Theology of European Integration: Comparing the Influence of Religious Histories on European Policies. You can pre-order at Amazon now.

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Mark R. Royce, Ph.D., teaches political science at George Mason University and NVCC Annandale and is author of the forthcoming Political Theology of European Integration: Comparing the Influence of Religious Histories on European Policies, which probes the religious ideas behind EU politics. He has written for The European LegacyInternational & Comparative Law Quarterly, and the Journal of Church & State.

Mark Melton is the Deputy Editor for Providence. He earned his Master’s degree in International Relations from the University of St. Andrews and focuses on Europe.

Photo Credit: St. Patrick’s Cathedral. By Miguel Mendez, via Flickr.