Christianity and Crisis

Our Dual Heritage of Freedom: Reformation & Enlightenment
Our Dual Heritage of Freedom: Reformation & Enlightenment

This article, delineating the two kinds of freedom found in the tradition of Western civilization, was originally published in Christianity and Crisis on October 19th, 1942. Editor Henry P. Van Dusen clarifies the two strands of freedom that have developed in European thought. One comes from the Protestant Reformation, a freedom that comes as a result of being created in God’s image and the rights that entail; the other comes from the Enlightenment, a freedom that is intrinsic to man’s nature and “self-evident,” something that is somehow apparent to all.

The Church in World Wars I and II: Adopting Christian Realism
The Church in World Wars I & II: Adopting Christian Realism

This article about the contrasting attitudes of the Church during World War I and II was originally published in Christianity…

The Churches and the War: Imploring Christian Conscience
The Churches and the War: Imploring Christian Conscience

This article, which might be described as a call to action for the church, was originally published in Christianity and Crisis on September 21, 1942. John C. Bennett challenges the church to avoid an indifferent neutrality in the face of clear evil and human suffering. The Christian conscience must be attuned to the realities of the world, aware that sin inhabits all hearts but that that cannot be used to reject any action.

The Spirit and the Body in War
The Spirit and the Body in War

This article about the tools necessary to defeat Nazi Germany and the Axis Powers was originally published in Christianity and Crisis on August 10, 1942.  Examining the relationship between ideals and power throughout history, editor Reinhold Niebuhr argues the importance of discerning and then actualizing, the Allied Powers’ potential power. Conversely, he advocates against succumbing to the belief that Nazi defeat is inevitable.

Lourdes Church ruins during World War II
The Church and the War

This provocative article written by Donald H. Stewart in the heat of World War II calls on the American Church to guide America toward a responsible patriotism which jettisons hatred and self-righteous aggrandizement while remembering “judgment belongeth unto God.”

Marines on Guam, July 21, 1944, displaying American Nationalism
American Nationalism

This article about the religious roots of American Nationalism was originally published in Christianity and Crisis on June 29, 1942. Tracing the spirit guiding American Nationalism from the Mayflower to the Founders, editor Howard C. Robbins argues the importance of a nationalism that acknowledges the profoundly Christian nature of the American Founding.

Reinhold Niebuhr and the Problem of Paradox
Reinhold Niebuhr and the Problem of Paradox

Against pacifist sentiment and calls for isolationism, Reinhold Niebuhr insisted on a realistic Christian response to political crises, one willing to dirty its hands to avoid catastrophic evil. However, his dialectic between love and justice produces a catastrophic paradox.

The Local Church and the War
The Local Church and the War

This article about the morality and justification of World War II and the Church was originally published in Christianity & Crisis in 1942.