Hiroshima

Lighten Up, Francis

Over the weekend, Pope Francis became the first leader of the Catholic Church since John Paul II in 1981 to…

The Problem of Post Hoc Ethics
The Problem of Post Hoc Ethics

In May, I had the wonderful opportunity to teach a week-long introduction to Christian ethics class at New Orleans Baptist…

Hiroshima atomic attack Christian ethics Zahnd
Moral Horror: Christian Ethics & Hiroshima

The attack on Hiroshima was a moral horror but not a moral wrong. As such, it reveals important committments that ought to guide Christian moral reasoning.

What You Should Know About Nuclear Weapons
What You Should Know About Nuclear Weapons

The U.S. Defense Department contains an inventory of roughly 7,100 nuclear warheads. About 4,760 are active, while approximately 2,340 warheads are retired, but still intact. The retired warheads are in storage and await dismantlement. Here is what you should know about nuclear weapons:

The Next President Should Outline the Real Lessons of Hiroshima from Pearl Harbor
The Next President Should Outline the Real Lessons of Hiroshima from Pearl Harbor

It’s a good exercise for world leaders to remember those horrific bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and to learn critical lessons from them. But the President and I disagree on the lessons to be learned.

A Sad Speech

In his remarks at Hiroshima, President Obama avoided delivering an outright apology for America’s use of atomic bombs to finally break the brutal war machine of Imperial Japan—a decision that won and ended a just war. Even so, the speech raises three unsettling issues.

Strategic bombing during WWII.
Hiroshima & the Dilemma of Force Protection

The observance of the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has garnered reflection, especially about the nature of apologies.

Test Baker marked the first-ever underwater nuclear explosion when the 23 kiloton device was detonated on July 25, 1946.
Thinking About the Unthinkable

It was a terrible anniversary. Seventy years ago this past week, at zero eight fifteen hours, August 6th, 1945, the Enola Gay, a U.S. Army Air Force B-29, dropped an 8,900-pound bomb, dubbed “Little Boy”, over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Three days later a second bomb, Fat Man, fell upon Nagasaki.