Nazi Germany

American Power and the Ways the World Ends
American Power and the Ways the World Ends

Are we, in fact, seeking through foreign policy to protect ourselves from a pre-millennial apocalypse—or, perhaps, to bring about a post-millennial one? The intellectual and spiritual resources of Protestant Christianity have a great deal to add to this debate. But up until now, I haven’t seen much evidence that these resources have yet been brought to bear on these questions.

Conviction in Crisis: The Image of God and Christian Global Responsibility
Conviction in Crisis: The Image of God and Christian Global Responsibility

This essay examines the perspectives of three eminent Christian leaders—Ambassador Charles Malik, Father Richard John Neuhaus, and Reverend Dietrich Bonhoeffer. They were shaped by different theological traditions (Greek Orthodox, Catholic, and Lutheran, respectively), but each wrestled with the political, cultural, and moral crises of their times according to their Christian convictions.

Meager Words and Memories: Remembering the Holocaust - International Holocaust Remembrance Day
Meager Words and Memories: Remembering the Holocaust

International Holocaust Remembrance Day is January 27. It’s an important and necessary day, given our tendency—as Americans and humans—to convince ourselves that history begins around our date of birth, to forget and move on, to think in terms of news cycles and tweets.

The Just War of Unjust Nations
The Just War of Unjust Nations

In nearly every war both sides point to the offenses and wickedness of their enemies, hoping to solidify that they are on the side of morality and godliness and to justify their decision to fight. The Axis Powers of World War II undoubtedly had perverse and wicked aims, but in this article Eduard Heimann argues that the democracies, and particularly the Christians living within them, deserve blame for the war as well.

A Basis of Christian Cooperation: Recovering Natural Law
A Basis of Christian Cooperation: Recovering Natural Law

This article about the history and future of Christian moral truth was originally published in Christianity and Crisis on December 28th, 1942. Contributor Barbara Ward details the history of Christian moral law, originally developed in the philosophical depths of the natural law tradition, all the way to its fracturing, resulting in the contemporaneous “will to power” found in Nazism. She councils Christians globally to recover this tradition and bring it to bear on the world in her day.

The Graveyard of Spirit in Central Europe
The Graveyard of Spirit in Central Europe

In this passionate piece written on December 14th, 1942, Christianity and Crisis contributor Joseph Hromadka argues that peace in Central Europe…

Never Surrender: Movie Review of Dunkirk
Never Surrender: Review of Dunkirk

The historic event grounding Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk involved a military crisis that was, in its beginning, as dark, desperate, and seemingly hopeless as it was extraordinary, full of heroism, and even miraculous in its conclusion. Whether his film captures any of that sufficiently is an open question.

What You Should Know About War Crimes
What You Should Know About War Crimes

During a hearing on Wednesday, judges upheld the war crimes conviction for Slobodan Praljak, an ex-commander of Bosnian Croat forces. Upon hearing the verdict, Praljak said he was not a criminal and then drank from a bottle containing poison. Here is what you should know about war crimes.

The Western Man's Arrogance: Including the Former Colonies
The Western Man’s Arrogance: Including the Former Colonies

This thought-provoking article, originally published in Christianity and Crisis on November 30th, 1942, suggests that a better post-war world is one that includes the colonies of the Western powers (the nations that were colonies at the time of this piece’s writing). Editor Miner Searle Bates chides the Allied powers for excluding nations such as China and India in their post-war planning and argues that they deserve a seat at the table.