Woodrow Wilson

Six WWI Lessons for US Christians

World War I profoundly affected American churches and Christian thought. Recalling that impact offers counsel for the future.

Monroe Doctrine 2.0: America Needs to Revive an Old Doctrine
Monroe 2.0: America Needs to Revive an Old Doctrine

We have heard much in recent years about Washington’s “Pacific pivot” aimed at deterring Chinese adventurism in the South China Sea and the “reassurance initiative” aimed at deterring Russian revisionism in Eastern Europe. What has received far less attention is Beijing’s pivot to the Americas and Moscow’s revival of Cold War-style intervention in the Western Hemisphere.

Should Trump-Putin Meeting Cause Alarm?
Should Trump-Putin Meeting Cause Alarm?

Christians should not be overly concerned about Trump meeting Putin, for now at least.

Resurrecting Woodrow Wilson: A Christian Critique of Liberal Internationalism
Resurrecting Woodrow Wilson: A Christian Critique of Liberal Internationalism

On January 8, 1918—one hundred years ago—President Woodrow Wilson mounted the rostrum of the House of Representatives, America’s inner sanctum of democracy, to deliver one of the most consequential speeches in history.

Some Soils and Seeds of Isolationism
Some Soils and Seeds of Isolationism

Isolation may be impractical, but its appeal is very understandable. In this article, originally published on June 14, 1943, in Christianity and Crisis, Charles Gilkey presents six influences upon this school of thought, and emphasizes the importance of giving primacy to the opinion of returning veterans in defining future U.S. foreign policy.

The Third Camp - Reinhold Niebuhr Theology and American Foreign Policy
The Third Camp: Reinhold Niebuhr’s Theology and American Foreign Policy

From the ashes of both Bryan’s ignoble isolationism and Wilson’s utopian universalism rose the school of Christian realism advocated by Reinhold Niebuhr.

Part 1: Protestant Roots of US Foreign Policy Divisions Michael Doran Mark Tooley FDR Teddy
Part 1: Protestant Roots of US Foreign Policy Divisions

The foreign policies of Teddy Roosevelt and his distant cousin Franklin D. Roosevelt represent an intersection between two different Protestant worldviews.

Why the League Failed
Why the League Failed: 13 Crippling Shortcomings

The much-maligned League of Nations experienced difficulties and shortcomings, which are visible in the functioning of the modern UN – and to a lesser extent, the International Criminal Court. George Stewart provides no less than thirteen reasons for the League’s failure, foremost among them the United States’ refusal to join, despite President Wilson’s labors as the prime architect. Stewart’s criticism of the League’s weaknesses, in its simultaneous impotence and incompetence, serves as a reminder for the need of robust, yet practical, international structures.

The Just War of Unjust Nations
The Just War of Unjust Nations

In nearly every war both sides point to the offenses and wickedness of their enemies, hoping to solidify that they are on the side of morality and godliness and to justify their decision to fight. The Axis Powers of World War II undoubtedly had perverse and wicked aims, but in this article Eduard Heimann argues that the democracies, and particularly the Christians living within them, deserve blame for the war as well.