Book Review

Sonnet from the Portuguese: A Review of Glenn Greenwald’s Securing Democracy
A Saga of Brazilian Corruption: Review of Glenn Greenwald’s Securing Democracy

Glenn Greenwald’s “Securing Democracy: My Fight for Press Freedom and Justice in Bolsonaro’s Brazil” explores his astonishing personal and professional confrontation with the rulers of his adopted home.

Either Meritocracy or the Common Good, Not Both: A Review of Michael Sandel’s The Tyranny of Merit
Either Meritocracy or the Common Good, Not Both: A Review of Michael Sandel’s The Tyranny of Merit

In The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common Good? Michael Sandel eloquently argues a sobering idea: America can pursue meritocracy or the common good, but not both.

How One Man Reduced Global Suffering: A Review of Robert D. Kaplan’s The Good American: The Epic Life of Bob Gersony, the U.S. Government's Greatest Humanitarian
How One Man Reduced Global Suffering: A Review of Robert D. Kaplan’s The Good American

“The Good American” is the story of how Robert Gersony, a high school dropout, affected governmental actions to reduce human misery and advance human rights. Because of his success in promoting humanitarian values, Kaplan calls him the US government’s “greatest humanitarian.”

Sympathy for Nationalists, but Little Hope: A Review of Samuel Goldman’s After Nationalism
Sympathy for Nationalists, but Little Hope: A Review of Samuel Goldman’s After Nationalism

Goldman responds to commentators who believe that Americans must return to some overarching identity and purpose. He argues that this task is difficult when the conditions that allowed previous unity no longer exist. Moreover, nationalists do not reasonably explain programs that could reignite a meaningful shared identity.

Away from Liberalism: A Review of Sohrab Ahmari’s The Unbroken Thread
Away from Liberalism: A Review of Sohrab Ahmari’s The Unbroken Thread

“The Unbroken Thread” by Sohrab Ahmari shows us that our human capacities and loves are not and cannot be strictly contained within the horizons of philosophic liberalism.

History, Evangelicals, and Race: A Review of Tisby’s The Color of Compromise
History, Evangelicals, and Race: A Review of Tisby’s The Color of Compromise

The Color of Compromise ostensibly promotes a radical new way of approaching politics that rethinks everything about evangelicals and political engagement. But if you can look past Tisby’s critique of conservatism, all of the fundamentals of popular evangelical political thinking in the post-war era are still at work.

Religious Freedom and the Kingdom of God: A Review of Andrew T. Walker’s Liberty for All
Religious Freedom and the Kingdom of God: A Review of Andrew T. Walker’s Liberty for All

Christians must advocate religious liberty not just for themselves, Walker argues, but “with the conviction that true freedom means allowing fellow citizens… to freely exercise their beliefs with dignity.”

The Book that Made America: A Review John R. Vile’s The Bible in American Law and Politics
The Book that Made America: A Review John R. Vile’s The Bible in American Law and Politics

The Bible in American Law and Politics: A Reference Guide, by John R. Vile, is a welcomed resource for surveying and exploring the Bible’s contributions to American political and legal cultures.

Don’t Deny Natural Rights: A Review of Nigel Biggar’s What’s Wrong with Rights?
Don’t Deny Natural Rights: A Review of Nigel Biggar’s What’s Wrong with Rights?

Today any serious book searching for the meaning of rights, natural rights, and human rights is welcome, but in “What’s Wrong with Rights?” Biggar seems preoccupied with a straw man—the claim that rights are absolute.