Book Review

The Unhappy Narcissism of Missionary Modernity: A Review of Jocelyn Cesari’s We God’s People
The Unhappy Narcissism of Missionary Modernity: A Review of Jocelyn Cesari’s We God’s People

Jocelyn Cesari’s latest—”We God’s People: Christianity, Islam and Hinduism in the World of Nations”—will take readers’ full attention. She does not suffer fools, either in style or substance, but those who come with a bit of background and an honest and sincere interest are not likely to find many her match.

Cold War Strategy for Today: A Review of Hal Brand’s The Twilight Struggle
Cold War Strategy for Today: A Review of Hal Brands’s The Twilight Struggle

Brands offers seven key lessons for his readers about what he terms a “twilight struggle,” a period of high-stakes competition between great powers that occurs between the darkness of war and daylight of peace.

Resurrection and the Christian Hope: Review of Timothy Keller’s Hope in Times of Fear

In “Hope in Times of Fear: The Resurrection and the Meaning of Easter,” Timothy Keller reflects on how and why the secular hope of progress has failed, and he instead offers the Christian reason for hope.

Reappraising American Goodness: A Review of McKenzie’s We the Fallen People
Reappraising American Goodness: A Review of McKenzie’s We the Fallen People

In We the Fallen People, Tracy McKenzie takes on the conviction that the moral intuition of the American electorate is the basis for our democratic flourishing. This belief is summarized in the phrase, “America is great because she is good.”

Pelagianism in Nelson’s The Theology of Liberalism
Pelagianism in Nelson’s The Theology of Liberalism

Yet what does Nelson mean by Pelagianism? A close reading of the book’s early pages shows that he offers three distinct formulations of the concept. Should we accept them? I argue that we should not.

America’s Afghanistan Deception: A Review of Craig Whitlock’s Afghanistan Papers
America’s Afghanistan Deception: A Review of Craig Whitlock’s Afghanistan Papers

“The Afghanistan Papers” by Craig Whitlock is modeled on the Pentagon Papers, which charged that the Johnson administration systematically lied to Congress and the public about the Vietnam War. This book makes the same charge against the Bush and Obama administrations.

Cities of Men and Architecture of God: A Review of Philip Bess’ Till We Have Built Jerusalem
Cities of Men and Architecture of God: A Review of Philip Bess’ Till We Have Built Jerusalem

Till We Have Built Jerusalem is a challenging book for daring to discuss the connection between ethics and aesthetic theories of architecture and urban design, what Bess calls our “built environment.”

Christianity’s Meritocratic Dilemma: Reflections on Sandel’s The Tyranny of Merit
Christianity’s Meritocratic Dilemma: Reflections on Sandel’s The Tyranny of Merit

Michael Sandel’s “The Tyranny of Merit” is an invitation to rethink a seemingly self-evident thought, that our social and economic position should be dictated solely by whether we deserve to have that position.

The Civil War Offers Public Diplomacy Lessons: A Review of Doyle’s The Cause of All Nations
The Civil War Offers Public Diplomacy Lessons: A Review of Doyle’s The Cause of All Nations

While most histories of the Civil War naturally focus on the drama in America, Don H. Doyle’s “The Cause of All Nations” explains how the conflict fits into broader world history and how events abroad affected the war.