Europe & Eurasia

US-Moldova Relations after June 2019

The Republic of Moldova is entering a new era after the events of June 2019, with the rise to power…

Dostoevsky’s “Russian God”: Russian Attitude Toward Faith and Christianity
Dostoevsky’s “Russian God”: Russian Attitude Toward Faith and Christianity

Winston Churchill famously stated that Russia “is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” While reading Fyodor Dostoevsky’s…

Stauffenberg and Tresckow: Consciences in Revolt
Valkyrie Revisited​: Stauffenberg and Tresckow, Consciences in Revolt

Last month marked the seventy-fifth anniversary of the failed bombing intended to assassinate the German Führer Adolf Hitler at his…

A Presbyterian in Orthodox Russia: Review of John Burgess’ Holy Rus’
A Presbyterian in Orthodox Russia: Review of John Burgess’ Holy Rus’

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary professor John Burgess’ Holy Rus’: The Rebirth of Orthodoxy in the New Russia is a broad survey…

Kazakhstan’s June 9 Elections and the Future of Tolerance and Diversity

President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev won Kazakhstan’s June 9 elections with 70 percent of the vote, while his closest challenger, Amirzhan Kosanov, obtained around 16 percent.

The West Overestimates Aleksandr Dugin’s Influence in Russia
The West Overestimates Aleksandr Dugin’s Influence in Russia

Proponents of the “Dugin the mastermind” argument need to substantiate their claims with evidence and ask themselves how effective, if at all, is Dugin at influencing Kremlin elites and Russian foreign policy.

An American Airman in Oxford: Reflections on D-Day, Major John Howard, and the US-UK Alliance
An American Airman in Oxford: Reflections on D-Day, Major John Howard, and the US-UK Alliance

Veterans of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Regiment, more commonly known simply as the “Ox and Bucks,” hosted our small US military contingent. The locus for the day’s ceremony was the gravesite of Major John Howard, commander of D Company of the Ox and Bucks.

The Treaty of Versailles and Religious Freedom
The Treaty of Versailles and Religious Freedom

The Treaty of Versailles, which ended World War I, was signed one hundred years ago this week. What is often forgotten is that this treaty—or better yet, set of treaties—did recognize and advance, albeit in a limited way, the religious freedom of average citizens.

1919: Wilson, the Covenant, and the Improbable League
1919: Wilson, the Covenant, and the Improbable League

Perhaps an insight from the character of Elrond in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, about the nature of our mortal lives, offers a measure of Christian realism in the face of Versailles: “And the Elves believed that evil was ended forever, and it was not so.”

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