Imperial Japan

Missionaries as Spies in World War II: A Review of Matthew A. Sutton’s Double Crossed
Missionaries as Spies in World War II: A Review of Matthew A. Sutton’s Double Crossed

Matthew A. Sutton’s Double Crossed is an important book that offers a case study of how religious leaders contributed to national security in a challenging wartime environment.

Whistling Past the Graveyard: How Iwo Jima Led Toward Hiroshima
Whistling Past the Graveyard: How Iwo Jima Led Toward Hiroshima

Last week marked the 75th anniversary of the end of the Battle of Iwo Jima. The Japanese intended to make the American cost of taking the island so severe they would reconsider invading the Japanese home islands. On this point, the Japanese condemned themselves by their very success. The shadow of Iwo Jima is arguably a mushroom cloud.

Christian Influence on US Foreign Policy

Formal religious adherence is declining, but America’s longtime religious self-identity as a lodestar of democratic responsibility in the world continues unabashed.

Lighten Up, Francis

Over the weekend, Pope Francis became the first leader of the Catholic Church since John Paul II in 1981 to…

Nationalism
The EU and the Misguided Reaction to Nationalist Movements

Nationalism is on the rise worldwide with nationalist-oriented leaders taking the helm in some of the largest countries.  Some call them “authoritarians,” others “populists.” 

Better Relations Between Government and Church in Soviet Russia

In a Byzantine relationship, a church can be forgiven for choosing not to denounce the government publicly. Henry Sloane Coffin…

Religion in Russia
Religion in Russia

In this piece, originally published in Christianity and Crisis on March 22, 1943, N.S. Timasheff notes that the godless policy of the Communist party didn’t indicate an irreligious populace.

“The Fork in the Road Which Leads to Victory”: The Campaign for Guadalcanal
“The Fork in the Road Which Leads to Victory”: The Campaign for Guadalcanal

If Guadalcanal foreshadowed the ultimate Allied victory, it also proved how difficult that triumph would be. It took six long, grueling months to oust Japan from the island, making clear to all ranks that every inch of the road to Tokyo would be bought with grit and determination—and paid for in blood.

The Home Front: Losing the Peace Through Revenge
The Home Front: Losing the Peace Through Revenge

The Treaty of Versailles did not cause World War II, but it hardly aimed to prevent it. In this article, originally published in Christianity and Crisis on April 5, 1943, D. Elton Trueblood warns against a vindictive peace driven by revenge – a fertile breeding ground for the next war. Trueblood deplores missing a chance at reversing centuries of intra-European carnage and preventing Asia from suffering a modern incarnation, all for the sake of revenge.