Reformed Theology

Why the Fruit of the Tree Is Rotten
Why the Fruit of the Tree Is Rotten

The Tree of Liberty, like every other tree, is judged by its fruits. The fruits of the tree are the citizens of the Republic, and the moral health of the Republic is known by the character of its citizens.

Report from the Liberated Netherlands, 1946
Report from the Liberated Netherlands, 1946

“Letter from Holland,” by L.H. RuitenbergAugust 5, 1946 While North Americans, on being informed of the church situation in Holland,…

The Political Idols of Our Age: A Review of David Koyzis’ Political Visions and Illusions
The Political Idols of Our Age: A Review of David Koyzis’ Political Visions and Illusions

Hopefully, with the latest edition of “Political Visions and Illusions,” David Koyzis’ work will no longer be hidden underneath a bushel, but instead, its brilliance will reach a wider audience.

Waiting for a Better Reformed Defense of Liberalism: A Review of Drunen’s Politics after Christendom
Waiting for a Better Reformed Defense of Liberalism: A Review of Van Drunen’s Politics after Christendom

Van Drunen’s Politics after Christendom doesn’t convincingly defend liberalism from a biblical perspective. Readers wanting a compelling Reformed defense of ordered liberty will have to keep waiting.

George Floyd and the Test for White Evangelicals
George Floyd and the Test for White Evangelicals

“After our arrival we went up to the town of Savannah; and the same evening I went to a friend’s…

Ten Theses on Christian Realism: A Reply to Scott McKnight
Ten Theses on Christian Realism: A Reply to Scot McKnight

Scott McKnight recently posted a blog on Christian realism quoting long sections from Lee Camp’s new manifesto Scandalous Witness. Daniel Strand responds.

New Christian Realism from the Amsterdam School: Review of Simon Polinder & Govert Bujis’ Christian Faith, Philosophy, and International Relations: The Lamb and the Wolf
New Christian Realism from the Amsterdam School: Review of Simon Polinder & Govert Bujis’ Christian Faith, Philosophy, and International Relations: The Lamb and the Wolf

Simon Polinder and Govert Bujis advance a new school of Christian international relations thinking that they call “The Amsterdam School.” Time will tell if this distinctively Neo-Calvinist international relations approach is possible.

More than a Big Fish: Review of Tim Keller’s Prodigal Prophet
More than a Big Fish: Review of Keller’s Prodigal Prophet

For Providence readers, there are three topics of particular interest from the Prodigal Prophet’s second half: justice, politics, and patriotism.

Politics as Missionary Field
Politics as Missionary Field

Politics is essential for any working society, let alone a thriving one. To the extent that Christians abandon politics or leave it to the jackals, society will suffer.