Mark Melton

Mark Melton

Mark Melton is the deputy editor for Providence. He earned his master’s degree in international relations from the University of St. Andrews and has focused on political economy, military affairs, and civil conflict, especially in Europe, Eurasia, and the Middle East. His bachelor’s degree in foreign language and international trade comes from Mississippi College. Prior to moving to DC, he worked as a political science adjunct professor at community colleges in Mississippi and also taught English in France.
Is a Transatlantic Breakup Coming? Five Geopolitical Trends to Watch in Europe in 2020
Is a Transatlantic Breakup Coming? Five Geopolitical Trends to Watch in 2020

An outright transatlantic breakup isn’t imminent today, but some European countries may eventually try to balance the US and China geopolitically.

The Last Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, or One of the Greats? Boris Johnson Scottish Independence
The Last Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, or One of the Greats?

If Boris Johnson responds successfully not only to English populism and Brexit but also Scottish nationalism, he would arguably become one of the great prime ministers of British history. Is he the right figure for the task?

Understand Brexit and the European Union Better by Understanding Theology: Review of Mark Royce’s The Political Theology of European Integration
Brexit and the European Union’s Overlooked Ingredient: Review of Mark Royce’s The Political Theology of European Integration

In October, the British Parliament approved Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s request for a general election, which will occur on Thursday….

How America Fights Wars in a Unique Way: Review of Patterson’s Just American Wars
How America’s Wars Have Been (Mostly) Just: Review of Eric Patterson’s Just American Wars

Eric Patterson contends in Just American Wars that the US is unique because of how it considers ethical and moral dilemmas when it fights. Particularly, the country’s democratic institutions force any politician who wishes to engage in a war to explain to voters, civil society, and other parts of the government why the war must be fought.

China’s Plan for a New World Order: Review of Maçães’ Belt and Road
China’s Plan for a New World Order: Review of Maçães’ Belt and Road

Resolution to America and China’s tit-for-tat trade war seems improbable for now. Last month the disputes continued when China retaliated…

ProvCast Ep. 39: What Boris Johnson Entails for US Foreign Policy

Deputy Editor Mark Melton speaks with Niall Walsh, the Western Europe analyst at Oxford Analytica. They cover how and whether…

More than a Big Fish: Review of Tim Keller’s Prodigal Prophet
More than a Big Fish: Review of Keller’s Prodigal Prophet

A version of this book review of Timothy Keller’s Prodigal Prophet first appeared in the Winter 2019 issue of Providence‘s…

Why Russia Didn’t Collapse Like Venezuela… For Now - Book Review of Chris Miller’s Putinomics: Power and Money in Resurgent Russia
Why Russia Didn’t Collapse Like Venezuela… For Now: Review of Miller’s Putinomics

Putin’s Russia still has numerous challenges today from corruption to slow economic growth, but Chris Miller argues in Putinomics that the federation should be compared to fellow petrostate Venezuela since both were similar in the late 1990s.

ProvCast Ep. 32: American Justness in War—from Independence, WWII, Vietnam, and Beyond

In this episode of the Foreign Policy ProvCast, Eric Patterson speaks about his book Just American Wars: Ethical Dilemmas in US Military History.

ProvCast Ep. 31: Pessimism over Human Rights’ Future (Aaron Rhodes)

In this episode of the Foreign Policy ProvCast, Aaron Rhodes speaks on his article about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) in the Winter 2019 issue of Providence’s print edition. He also addresses the differences between human rights and political questions, the human rights situation in various countries, how China violates these rights with its reeducation camps for Uighur Muslims, why he’s pessimistic about the future, and what the global community can do to reform and promote human rights.