Marc LiVecche

Marc LiVecche is the executive editor of Providence. He is also Scholar of Christian Ethics, War, & Peace at the Institute on Religion & Democracy and a research scholar at Philos Project. From the summer of 2017 to fall of 2020, he is serving as the McDonald Visiting Scholar at the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, & Public Life at Christ Church, Oxford University. While there, he is working on a number of publishing projects, including a book-length argument for the morality of the bombing of Hiroshima.

Prior to these roles, he completed doctoral studies at the University of Chicago, where he worked under the supervision of the political theorist and public intellectual Jean Bethke Elshtain, until her death in August, 2013. Marc’s dissertation, With Malice Toward None: The Moral Ground for Killing in War, takes a classic just war view of the question of killing in its theological and ethical dimensions in part as a response to the crisis of moral injury. Before all that, Marc spent twelve years doing a variety of things in Central Europe—ranging from helping build sport and recreational leagues in post-communist communities, to working at a Christian study and research center, to leading seminars on history and ethics onsite at the former Auschwitz-Birkenau Nazi concentration camp in Poland. This latter experience allowed him to continue his undergraduate study of the Shoah; a process which helped permanently inoculate him against pacifism.

Restraint and Resolve: Christian Realism and the Requirements of Courage - George Floyd - Just War Tradition
Restraint and Resolve: Christian Realism and the Requirements of Courage

Through a Christian realist lens, the police officer’s mission closely corresponds to the just war tradition’s aim of promoting order, justice, and peace. Marc LiVecche reviews how the police failed in the killing of George Floyd.

Ministers of Justice

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years…

Marksism | Episode 1: R.R. Reno, Nuclear Weapons, and More
Marksism | Episode 1: R.R. Reno, Nuclear Weapons, and More

In the first episode of what will be a weekly series, the three Providence editors—Mark Tooley (editor), Mark Melton (managing…

The Crucible of Hell: A Conversation with Saul David
The Crucible of Hell: A Conversation with Saul David

Writing about his experience in the Battle of Okinawa, US Marine Eugene Sledge reported that “men struggled and fought and…

V-E Day and the American Profession of Arms: A Conversation with Col. Mallard

On this V-E Day, Marc LiVecche connected with Col. Timothy Mallard, Command Chaplain for US Army Europe, to discuss the…

Who Can Be Killed in War? A Conversation with Joseph Chapa on the Just War Tradition
Who Can Be Killed in War? A Conversation with Joseph Chapa on the Just War Tradition

To what degree are combatants in war morally liable to be killed, and to what degree are their adversaries morally…

Christian Realism and Fires that Won’t Go Away: A Book Review of William Brodrick A Whispered Name
Christian Realism and Fires that Won’t Go Away: A Review of William Brodrick’s A Whispered Name

William Brodrick’s “A Whispered Name” is a lyrical reflection on responsibility, judgment, grief, the elusiveness of justice, reconciliation, and human longing.

Whistling Past the Graveyard: How Iwo Jima Led Toward Hiroshima
Whistling Past the Graveyard: How Iwo Jima Led Toward Hiroshima

Last week marked the 75th anniversary of the end of the Battle of Iwo Jima. The Japanese intended to make the American cost of taking the island so severe they would reconsider invading the Japanese home islands. On this point, the Japanese condemned themselves by their very success. The shadow of Iwo Jima is arguably a mushroom cloud.

Love and the Bug: Solidarity amid Social Distance
Love and the Bug: Solidarity amid Social Distance

Albert Camus’ “The Plague” is a study of how the various townspeople relate to one another during a catastrophe. The book has always been good for reflection, but now it’s truly a mirror.

Christian Soldiers as Peacemakers
Christian Soldiers as Peacemakers

Marc LiVecche—executive editor of Providence and the McDonald Visiting Scholar at the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, & Public Life…