WWII

The Christian as Citizen, Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki
The Christian as Citizen, Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki

The reclamation of a two-kingdom theology is a first step toward more careful and responsible thinking about issues such as Harry Truman’s decision to bomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Christian Reflection on Hiroshima/Nagasaki 75th Anniversary

Next month is the 75th anniversary of the USA atomic strikes on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Here’s my conversation with two…

A Christian View on Sovereignty

This article by Gerald Monsman from 75 years ago, originally titled “Reflections on Sovereignty,” addresses whether the United States should cooperate with other countries for the global good.

Missionaries as Spies in World War II: A Review of Matthew A. Sutton’s Double Crossed
Missionaries as Spies in World War II: A Review of Matthew A. Sutton’s Double Crossed

Matthew A. Sutton’s Double Crossed is an important book that offers a case study of how religious leaders contributed to national security in a challenging wartime environment.

Memorial Day & General Kroesen

General Frederick Kroesen, veteran of three wars and survivor of an assassination attempt, died last week, age 97.  Six years…

Ministers of Justice

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years…

The Last Lion Snarled: Three Scenes from the Olympian Life of Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill was no perfect man. But in this week, the eightieth anniversary of the beginning of his prime ministerial effort to save Britain particularly and Western civilization generally, we speak peace to his ashes and honor to his memory.

Reinhold Niebuhr and the Second World War

Beginning in 1940, Reinhold Niebuhr made the case for a sober, realistic, and morally grounded US involvement overseas, out of the central admission that whatever America’s own faults, a punctilious detachment from world affairs might very well result in the triumph of greater imbalances and injustices

Christian Influence on US Foreign Policy

Formal religious adherence is declining, but America’s longtime religious self-identity as a lodestar of democratic responsibility in the world continues unabashed.