United Kingdom (UK)

Britain and the “Real” End of World War II
Britain and the “Real” End of World War II

Last month was the seventy-fifth anniversary of V-J Day—Victory over Japan, August 14, 1945—the official end of World War II. Yet most Britons prefer to celebrate V-E Day—Victory in Europe, May 8, 1945—the defeat of Nazi Germany. Why so?

The Armenian Genocide and America’s Rise to Global Power: Book Review of Charlie Laderman Sharing the Burden
The Armenian Genocide and America’s Global Role: A Review of Laderman’s Sharing the Burden

Charlie Laderman’s “Sharing the Burden” provides a thoroughly researched and highly compelling account of how the Armenian question acted as a catalyst for an emerging American-British geopolitical alliance and the United States’ rise as a predominant actor in the international arena.

The World Finally Sees Xi’s China as It Is
The World Finally Sees Xi’s China as It Is

After years of wishful thinking, America and its allies in the Indo-Pacific are returning, finally, to what President Franklin Roosevelt called “armed defense of democratic existence.” Given Beijing’s actions both at home and abroad, one wonders what took them so long.

COVID-19 and Future World Order
COVID-19 and Future World Order

While it is still too early to ascertain the COVID-19 pandemic’s damage to our country and the world, it is already evident that the crisis will result in structural changes within and among countries.

Abraham Kuyper Among the Nations
Abraham Kuyper among the Nations

We have an introductory, if provisional, picture of anti-Revolutionary foreign policy and Abraham Kuyper’s platform coming into the highest political office in the Netherlands in the early twentieth century. How did this platform fair? What “necessary adjustments” (as Kuyper called them) did he need to make between his Calvinistic international theory and the actual work of foreign policy?

Abraham Kuyper Overseas Manifesto
Abraham Kuyper’s Overseas Manifesto

While much has been made of Abraham Kuyper’s Calvinistic contributions to domestic political theory, very little (in English) has been said of his foreign policy.

Christian Realism and Fires that Won’t Go Away: A Book Review of William Brodrick A Whispered Name
Christian Realism and Fires that Won’t Go Away: A Review of William Brodrick’s A Whispered Name

William Brodrick’s “A Whispered Name” is a lyrical reflection on responsibility, judgment, grief, the elusiveness of justice, reconciliation, and human longing.

Herbert Butterfield: Britain’s Reinhold Niebuhr?

Herbert Butterfield’s Christian faith essentially inspired his view of history and government and made him the English forerunner of a hopeful Christian Realism as an alternative to both Western secular materialist liberalism and collectivist atheist Marxism.

Why Americans Should Critique Their Government, Even When Others Are Worse

Christianity and Crisis published the following editorial by Reinhold Niebuhr on February 19, 1945. He explains not only why his publication criticized the United States’ foreign policies as the country fought Nazi Germany, but also why Christians should not have uncritical loyalty to the nation.