Adolf Hitler

Stauffenberg and Tresckow: Consciences in Revolt
Valkyrie Revisited​: Stauffenberg and Tresckow, Consciences in Revolt

Last month marked the seventy-fifth anniversary of the failed bombing intended to assassinate the German Führer Adolf Hitler at his…

A Christian Understanding of Human Rights
A Christian Understanding of Human Rights

The United States can protect its interests and promulgate its values at the same time. If we are to be exceptional, we must live in the tension that exceptionalism brings.

The Vice of Nationalism
The Vice of Nationalism

There seems to be something of a movement to revive the “virtue of nationalism” today, both in America and—with Brexit the apparent battle flag—the rest of the world. This is a mistake.

Hitler Zionist
Was Hitler Really a Zionist?

There is a sinister aspect to any claim that “Hitler was a Zionist.”

Assassinate Assad?
Assassinate Assad?

Following the Christian just war tradition, could the assassination of Syria’s Bashar al-Assad be justified, despite its illegal nature?

Better Relations Between Government and Church in Soviet Russia

In a Byzantine relationship, a church can be forgiven for choosing not to denounce the government publicly. Henry Sloane Coffin…

NATO Compass, Izmir, Turkey
NATO Takes the Fifth

What does NATO need to do going forward? The short answer: more and less.

No Peace With Hitler's Generals: Conquer the Military Caste
No Peace With Hitler’s Generals: Conquer the Military Caste

Almost all nations field armies; fewer, even in 1943, retained a warrior caste who dominated nearly every facet of political and cultural life. In this incisive article, originally published in Christianity and Crisis on March 8, 1943, Robert E. Fitch argues that winning the War and achieving peace stems from breaking the feudal martial classes of Hitler’s Nazi Germany and Tojo’s Imperial Japan.

Meager Words and Memories: Remembering the Holocaust - International Holocaust Remembrance Day
Meager Words and Memories: Remembering the Holocaust

International Holocaust Remembrance Day is January 27. It’s an important and necessary day, given our tendency—as Americans and humans—to convince ourselves that history begins around our date of birth, to forget and move on, to think in terms of news cycles and tweets.