Jus Post Bellum

Conciliation after the Russia-Ukraine War | Just Post Bellum Series, Part 5
Conciliation after the Russia-Ukraine War | Jus Post Bellum Series, Part 5

If order is the attainable and justice the possible, then (re)conciliation is the desirable. Conciliation is future-focused in that it sees former enemies as partners in a shared future.

Punishment and Restitution after the Russia-Ukraine War | Jus Post Bellum Series, Part 3
Punishment and Restitution after the Russia-Ukraine War | Jus Post Bellum Series, Part 3

Jus post bellum justice provides us with two criteria: holding aggressors responsible (punishment) and providing some form of restoration to victims (restitution). The reality of our time suggests a very limited justice.

Order and Justice after the Russia-Ukraine War | Jus Post Bellum Series, Part 2
Order and Justice after the Russia-Ukraine War | Jus Post Bellum Series, Part 2

Before taking a look at justice, let’s take a step back and consider the explicitly Christian foundations for thinking about political order.

Just War Order and Ukraine: At War's End
Just War Order and Ukraine | Jus Post Bellum Series, Part 1

The jus post bellum (the ethics of ending war and building peace) categories of order, justice, and conciliation can help us think through how the war in Ukraine should end.

Neither World War II nor Vietnam: 9/11 and the New Paradigms of War
Neither World War II nor Vietnam: 9/11 and the New Paradigms of War

In her 2003 book Just War Against Terror, Jean Bethke Elshtain argued for a new paradigm for a just war: the fight against global terrorism, particularly terrorism perpetrated by followers of militant Islam. Twenty years after 9/11, this claim is due for revisiting.

How the Bush Administration Failed: A Review of Robert Draper’s To Start a War
How the Bush Administration Failed: A Review of Robert Draper’s To Start a War

Robert Draper’s book To Start a War details why the Bush administration made a gravely mistaken decision, despite having clearly met the jus ad bellum criteria of “right intention.”

Have American Wars Been Just? Review of Mark Hall and J. Daryl Charles’ America and the Just War Tradition
Have American Wars Been Just? Review of Mark Hall and J. Daryl Charles’ America and the Just War Tradition

Whether one is a historian who hopes to learn more about America’s conflicts, a philosopher who works in ethics or political philosophy, or a soldier or veteran who enjoys military history, America and the Just War Tradition addresses each of these topics and audiences from a variety of authors in a range of disciplines.

How America Fights Wars in a Unique Way: Review of Patterson’s Just American Wars
How America’s Wars Have Been (Mostly) Just: Review of Eric Patterson’s Just American Wars

Eric Patterson contends in Just American Wars that the US is unique because of how it considers ethical and moral dilemmas when it fights. Particularly, the country’s democratic institutions force any politician who wishes to engage in a war to explain to voters, civil society, and other parts of the government why the war must be fought.

Just Prudence: Defending Aquinas on Preemption, Prevention, & Decisiveness in War
Just Prudence: Defending Aquinas on Preemption, Prevention, & Decisiveness in War

St. Thomas Aquinas knew more than his modern emendators do about grounding his just war deliberations—and much else—in the cardinal moral virtue of prudence.

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