Realism

Neville Chamberlain declaring peace in his time: September 30, 1938
The Folly of Wishful Thinking Idealism: the Indwelling Sin of All Men

Wishful Thinking Idealism, unlike Christian Realism, believes that everyone, even competition, is fundamentally reasonable.

Corrymeela, Northern Ireland: a Christian Outpost in a Nation at War with Itself (Part Two)

Corrymeela’s community believes no one can unwind every evil of the past, so each person can only decide how he will live with others in the present.

Heroism and Collectivism: Ukraine and Russia’s Diverging Strategies of Warfare

if the flooding of the frontlines by unprepared new recruits results in exorbitant Russian casualties, the true effect may be to make Russia’s armed forces look weaker than ever.

Moral Courage and the Grim Necessity of Sacrifice 

American audiences are still hungry for cinematic portrayals of the old virtues: patriotism, heroism, courage, and self-sacrifice

The Reaper Strike on Zawahiri

The Reaper combines mission effectiveness and non-combatant immunity that is unachievable in many, if not most, battlefield scenarios.

Graebner the Great on America’s Power

When in 1967 the University of Virginia recruited Professor Norman A. Graebner from the University of Illinois to teach diplomatic history, a huge row ensued.

Five Impressions on Niebuhr and Co., 1945–47

From 1945 to 1947 as the United States and Soviet Union moved toward the Cold War, Christian realists writing for Reinhold Niebuhr’s journal, Christianity and Crisis, responded to global dilemmas. Here are five impressions of those articles, along with lessons for today.

Russia-Ukraine War from a Moral-Realist Approach
Russia-Ukraine War from a Moral-Realist Approach

From this moral realism, it is justified to strive for a balance of power to realize a little more justice or a little less injustice.

Just War is Not a Foreign Policy
Just War is Not a Foreign Policy

Just war thinking is moral analysis of military action, not a framework for foreign policy. Acknowledging these limitations helps us to become better just war casuists, and it highlights the need for values-driven strategic thinking in the foreign policy sphere.