French Revolution

What Robert Kagan Gets Wrong about Liberalism and Authoritarianism
What Robert Kagan Gets Wrong about Liberalism and Authoritarianism

Robert Kagan is correct that there are political movements that oppose neoliberal and neoconservative universalism. Authoritarianism is one of them. So, too, is Tocquevillian liberalism.

Immortal Memory: What Scotland’s Robert Burns Can Teach Us about Nationalism
Immortal Memory: What Scotland’s Robert Burns Can Teach Us about Nationalism

Tonight people will gather for Burns Night to remember one of Scotland’s national heroes. But should this man’s flaws cause us to rethink his place in national mythmaking and nationalism in general?

British and American Approaches to the Peace

Providence continues to look back at how American Christians thought through the challenges of World War II 75 years ago. In this article that Christianity & Crisis originally published on May 17, 1943, Henry P. Van Dusen proclaims that the postwar peace would rely on international consensus.

American Power and the Ways the World Ends
American Power and the Ways the World Ends

Are we, in fact, seeking through foreign policy to protect ourselves from a pre-millennial apocalypse—or, perhaps, to bring about a post-millennial one? The intellectual and spiritual resources of Protestant Christianity have a great deal to add to this debate. But up until now, I haven’t seen much evidence that these resources have yet been brought to bear on these questions.

Our Dual Heritage of Freedom: Reformation & Enlightenment
Our Dual Heritage of Freedom: Reformation & Enlightenment

This article, delineating the two kinds of freedom found in the tradition of Western civilization, was originally published in Christianity and Crisis on October 19th, 1942. Editor Henry P. Van Dusen clarifies the two strands of freedom that have developed in European thought. One comes from the Protestant Reformation, a freedom that comes as a result of being created in God’s image and the rights that entail; the other comes from the Enlightenment, a freedom that is intrinsic to man’s nature and “self-evident,” something that is somehow apparent to all.

Exalting the Humble and Meek: Book Review of Janet Polasky Revolutions without Borders
Exalting the Humble and Meek

Janet Polasky’s Revolutions without Borders seeks to once more recapture the cosmopolitan, borderless, and dynamic character of revolutionary politics.

Book Review Samuel Moyn Christian Human Rights
The Secret History of a Popular Idea

Samuel Moyn’s Christian Human Rights argues that human rights should not be associated exclusively with the secular liberal left and liberal politics when the Christian right was historically involved with this project.