Harry Truman

Horseshoe Theory is Now Reality

Since the end of WWII, support for Israel has been a shared consensus on the center-left and right

Oppenheimer, Nukes & Communists

Very smart people, no less than regular people, can become wickedly insane in their political judgments.

Land of the Rising Dead, Part One: Warrior Spirits

In Japan, even the dead get a say in how the nation’s war-machine should be run by the living.

Defending the Liberal International Order

From Kabul to Kiev, from the South China Sea to the Persian Gulf, from space to cyberspace, the U.S.-led international…

Five Impressions on Niebuhr and Co., 1945–47

From 1945 to 1947 as the United States and Soviet Union moved toward the Cold War, Christian realists writing for Reinhold Niebuhr’s journal, Christianity and Crisis, responded to global dilemmas. Here are five impressions of those articles, along with lessons for today.

Niebuhr’s European Impressions: From Truman Doctrine to State Churches
Niebuhr’s European Impressions: From Truman Doctrine to State Churches

After traveling through Europe in 1947—including to Scotland, Amsterdam, and Switzerland—Reinhold Niebuhr wrote some reflections, including on state churches, the Truman Doctrine, Christian political parties, and more.

Christian Disagreement at the Dawn of the Cold War - Truman Doctrine - Communism
Christian Disagreement at the Dawn of the Cold War

“Unless we accept the Russian view of the nature of man, we cannot work with the USSR to a common end for human society.”

Christian Realists on the Truman Doctrine and Greek Civil War
Christian Realists on the Truman Doctrine and Greek Civil War

During an address to the US Congress on March 12, 1947, President Harry Truman called for military and economic aid to Turkey and Greece to counter communist threats. This began the Truman Doctrine, and Christian realists responded a month later.

Firmness or Conciliation for Russia: Reinhold Niebuhr in 1947
Firmness or Conciliation for Russia: Reinhold Niebuhr in 1947

We are told that a policy of firmness must inevitably lead to war, while conciliation could guarantee peace. In the Nazi days this was called appeasement.