Vietnam War

How America Fights Wars in a Unique Way: Review of Patterson’s Just American Wars
How America’s Wars Have Been (Mostly) Just: Review of Eric Patterson’s Just American Wars

Eric Patterson contends in Just American Wars that the US is unique because of how it considers ethical and moral dilemmas when it fights. Particularly, the country’s democratic institutions force any politician who wishes to engage in a war to explain to voters, civil society, and other parts of the government why the war must be fought.

Humbling Account of a Vietnam Tragedy: Review of Bowden’s Hue 1968
Humbling Account of a Vietnam Tragedy: Review of Mark Bowden’s Hue 1968

Mark Bowden’s Hue 1968: A Turning Point of the American War in Vietnam is a book about an epic tragedy….

Evangelicals’ Foreign Policy Views Are More Diverse than Academic Portrayals | Book Review of Timothy D. Padgett’s Swords and Plowshares
Evangelicals’ Views on Foreign Policy and War Are More Diverse than Many Assume | Review of Padgett’s Swords and Plowshares

Modern authors tend to view American evangelicals as a monolithic assembly, rarely describing the varying facets of their beliefs. In his book “Swords and Plowshares: American Evangelicals on War, 1937–1973,” Timothy D. Padgett attempts to dispel this misconception.

Lessons In Christian Realism from the Life of John McCain
Lessons In Christian Realism from the Life of John McCain

As a journal of Christianity and American foreign policy, we wish to acknowledge the distinct contribution made by Sen. McCain to the advancement of Christian virtues in the field of American foreign affairs and American Foreign Policy. 

Robert Kennedy and the Great "What if?"
Robert Kennedy and the Great “What if?”

Robert Kennedy had rejected the anti-Semitism of his father, Ambassador Joe Kennedy, and had pledged to send 50 jet fighters to Israel to help that small, embattled country survive in a sea of enemies. For that, he would pay with his life.

Burns and Novick’s The Vietnam War is Profoundly and Fundamentally Wrong
Burns and Novick’s The Vietnam War is Profoundly and Fundamentally Wrong

From my perspective the Ken Burns and Lynn Novick production of “The Vietnam War” had but one objective: to reinforce the standard anti-war narrative that the Vietnam War was unwinnable, illegal, immoral, and ineptly conducted by the allies from start to finish.

What Ken Burns Omits From The Vietnam War

Although Burns and Novick don’t besmirch veterans as flagrantly, their misrepresentation of the war and its warriors has reopened old wounds. It’s not just Vietnam veterans’ reputations at stake; how we view this war shapes how we view ourselves as Americans.

Just War & National Honor: The Case of Vietnam
Just War & National Honor: The Case of Vietnam

Just war theorizing has typically left the issue of national honor untouched, although warriors and statesmen routinely emphasize the importance of vindicating the sacrifice of the fallen. Does prolonging a war in order to assuage or vindicate national honor comport with the just war tradition?

Loser America?

Jesuit priest and author Thomas Reese wrote a Religion News Service column critical of the US missile strikes on Syria’s…