Constitution

As Christian as Cherry Pie

The study of international relations history, history in general, and the origins and nature of diplomacy and international law reveals the absolutely central role that Christian faith has played in the development of these concepts.

The National Popular Vote: A Dangerous Popularity Contest - NPVIC
The National Popular Vote: A Dangerous Popularity Contest

It’s worth noting here that the “anachronistic” system the Founding Fathers crafted in the eighteenth century—based on the will and procedures of semi-sovereign states—serves as an extra layer of protection against twenty-first-century threats.

Revoking Birthright Citizenship: A Trial Balloon or Terrible Idea?

One of the most peculiar moments in the run-up to the 2018 midterms was a trial balloon, floated by President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, to remove birthright citizenship from the children of illegal immigrants via executive order. This is not the first time in recent memory the issue of birthright citizenship for illegal immigrants has come up.

The Debt Christian Foreign Policy Owes Thomas Aquinas
The Debt Christian Foreign Policy Owes Thomas Aquinas

St. Thomas Aquinas’ ideas about just war still affect how Americans feel about wars, including World War II and the Persian Gulf War.

British and American Approaches to the Peace

Providence continues to look back at how American Christians thought through the challenges of World War II 75 years ago. In this article that Christianity & Crisis originally published on May 17, 1943, Henry P. Van Dusen proclaims that the postwar peace would rely on international consensus.

George Washington President's Day
George Washington & American Power

Washington’s model is still within our reach. But it would require a renewed appreciation for the limits of the presidency, the limits of politics, and a renewed focus on the importance of character.

Why the League Failed
Why the League Failed: 13 Crippling Shortcomings

The much-maligned League of Nations experienced difficulties and shortcomings, which are visible in the functioning of the modern UN – and to a lesser extent, the International Criminal Court. George Stewart provides no less than thirteen reasons for the League’s failure, foremost among them the United States’ refusal to join, despite President Wilson’s labors as the prime architect. Stewart’s criticism of the League’s weaknesses, in its simultaneous impotence and incompetence, serves as a reminder for the need of robust, yet practical, international structures.

Our Dual Heritage of Freedom: Reformation & Enlightenment
Our Dual Heritage of Freedom: Reformation & Enlightenment

This article, delineating the two kinds of freedom found in the tradition of Western civilization, was originally published in Christianity and Crisis on October 19th, 1942. Editor Henry P. Van Dusen clarifies the two strands of freedom that have developed in European thought. One comes from the Protestant Reformation, a freedom that comes as a result of being created in God’s image and the rights that entail; the other comes from the Enlightenment, a freedom that is intrinsic to man’s nature and “self-evident,” something that is somehow apparent to all.

Venezuela referendum
Venezuelan Referendum: Maduro’s Strongest Pillar Has Fallen

On July 16, more than 7 million Venezuelan citizens voted in a national referendum. The Venezuelan people have spoken. Now the world needs to respond.