WWII-75

Goodness Happened There: Le Chambon-sur-Lignon against the Holocaust

Over the nearly four years running from December 1940 to September 1944, the inhabitants of the French village of Le…

The Problem of Post Hoc Ethics
The Problem of Post Hoc Ethics

In May, I had the wonderful opportunity to teach a week-long introduction to Christian ethics class at New Orleans Baptist…

Stauffenberg and Tresckow: Consciences in Revolt
Valkyrie Revisited​: Stauffenberg and Tresckow, Consciences in Revolt

Last month marked the seventy-fifth anniversary of the failed bombing intended to assassinate the German Führer Adolf Hitler at his…

And Still They Came: Reflections on Normandy and the Holiness of Sacrifice
And Still They Came: Reflections on Normandy and the Holiness of Sacrifice

I was honored to offer the invocation at Colleville-sur-Mer, France, for the seventy-fifth D-Day anniversary memorial ceremony on June 6, 2019. This, of course, is the town name of the place that many Americans know simply by the more infamous moniker of Omaha Beach.

An American Airman in Oxford: Reflections on D-Day, Major John Howard, and the US-UK Alliance
An American Airman in Oxford: Reflections on D-Day, Major John Howard, and the US-UK Alliance

Veterans of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Regiment, more commonly known simply as the “Ox and Bucks,” hosted our small US military contingent. The locus for the day’s ceremony was the gravesite of Major John Howard, commander of D Company of the Ox and Bucks.

An Ecumenical Consensus: A Moral Calling for International Engagement
An Ecumenical Consensus

In this article, originally published on July 26, 1943, in Christianity and Crisis, John C. Bennett praises the document “The Church and International Reconstruction” issued by the World Council of Churches. He notes that it unequivocally supports public engagement by the Church, organized worldwide political interaction, and consistent condemnation of national shortcomings for all countries, not merely those most culpable.

Some Soils and Seeds of Isolationism
Some Soils and Seeds of Isolationism

Isolation may be impractical, but its appeal is very understandable. In this article, originally published on June 14, 1943, in Christianity and Crisis, Charles Gilkey presents six influences upon this school of thought, and emphasizes the importance of giving primacy to the opinion of returning veterans in defining future U.S. foreign policy.

British and American Approaches to the Peace

Providence continues to look back at how American Christians thought through the challenges of World War II 75 years ago. In this article that Christianity & Crisis originally published on May 17, 1943, Henry P. Van Dusen proclaims that the postwar peace would rely on international consensus.

American Power and World Responsibility
American Power and World Responsibility

The United States’ involvement in two world wars indicates clearly that American isolationism is at a practical end, Reinhold Niebuhr asserts in this article, originally published on April 5, 1943 in Christianity and Crisis. Working toward international integration is a national responsibility – morally and in the interests of security. Alliances depend on the will of their members; it is no different for the United States. Niebuhr also warns of a new danger: a unilateral “imperialist” American military establishment, simultaneously preoccupied with hegemony and unconcerned with the rest of the world.