WWII-75

The Crucible of Hell: A Conversation with Saul David
The Crucible of Hell: A Conversation with Saul David

Writing about his experience in the Battle of Okinawa, US Marine Eugene Sledge reported that “men struggled and fought and…

Victory in Europe Day & Human Equality

Today is the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, so it’s appropriate that I’m reading about one of its…

V-E Day and the American Profession of Arms: A Conversation with Col. Mallard

On this V-E Day, Marc LiVecche connected with Col. Timothy Mallard, Command Chaplain for US Army Europe, to discuss the…

Soberness in Victory: A Reflection on V-E Day from 75 Years Ago

On May 8, 1945, the Allies accepted Nazi Germany’s unconditional surrender. Shortly thereafter, Reinhold Niebuhr explained why the victors should be sober and humble.

Why Americans Should Critique Their Government, Even When Others Are Worse

Christianity and Crisis published the following editorial by Reinhold Niebuhr on February 19, 1945. He explains not only why his publication criticized the United States’ foreign policies as the country fought Nazi Germany, but also why Christians should not have uncritical loyalty to the nation.

Whistling Past the Graveyard: How Iwo Jima Led Toward Hiroshima
Whistling Past the Graveyard: How Iwo Jima Led Toward Hiroshima

Last week marked the 75th anniversary of the end of the Battle of Iwo Jima. The Japanese intended to make the American cost of taking the island so severe they would reconsider invading the Japanese home islands. On this point, the Japanese condemned themselves by their very success. The shadow of Iwo Jima is arguably a mushroom cloud.

America’s Role in Global Peace: Reexamining John Foster Dulles’ 1945 Address
America’s Role in Global Peace: Reexamining John Foster Dulles’ 1945 Address

Understanding how Christian statesmen like John Foster Dulles viewed difficult foreign policy issues can help Christians respond to contemporary dilemmas.

“Never Again” Are Fighting Words
“Never Again” Are Fighting Words

What will be lost to many—including too many Christians—is the fact that this pledge of “never again” is, if it is to mean anything at all, a promise to fight if, in the last resort and with the aim of peace, nothing else will protect the innocent, requite an injustice, or punish evil.

Goodness Happened There: Le Chambon-sur-Lignon against the Holocaust

Over the nearly four years running from December 1940 to September 1944, the inhabitants of the French village of Le…