WWI

How “Strategic Ambiguity” Led to the Great War
How “Strategic Ambiguity” Led to the Great War

What we can gain from the origins of the Great War is that strategic ambiguity played a role in bringing on that cataclysm.

C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkein, and War - Joseph Loconte
C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkein, and War

Joseph Loconte talked about how C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien’s experiences in the First World War affected their lives and future writing.

Fight to Win: A Lesson from the Great War
Fight to Win: A Lesson from the Great War

It is because we desire the good of concord that we fight for a decisive end to conflict, one that secures and allows the enforcement of a durable peace.

Lessons & Leftovers of the Great War
Lessons and Leftovers of the Great War

A century after the Great War’s end, we still have much to learn from its lessons and still wrestle with its consequences and leftovers.

Keep Your Eyes on the Trees: An Essay on 1917, the Most Profound Film Since Tree of Life
Keep Your Eyes on the Trees: An Essay on 1917, the Most Profound Film Since Tree of Life

1917 certainly is not a “one trick” movie, nor is it “soulless” or “bad” or “bombast” or a mere slice of cake. No, it is a work of art. It is a beautiful film. It is a deceptively deep inquiry into the value of life, the treasured heritage of Western civilization, and the importance of martial courage.

Christian Realism and Fires that Won’t Go Away: A Book Review of William Brodrick A Whispered Name
Christian Realism and Fires that Won’t Go Away: A Review of William Brodrick’s A Whispered Name

William Brodrick’s “A Whispered Name” is a lyrical reflection on responsibility, judgment, grief, the elusiveness of justice, reconciliation, and human longing.

Christian Influence on US Foreign Policy

Formal religious adherence is declining, but America’s longtime religious self-identity as a lodestar of democratic responsibility in the world continues unabashed.

The Treaty of Versailles and Religious Freedom
The Treaty of Versailles and Religious Freedom

The Treaty of Versailles, which ended World War I, was signed one hundred years ago this week. What is often forgotten is that this treaty—or better yet, set of treaties—did recognize and advance, albeit in a limited way, the religious freedom of average citizens.