Second World War (WWII)

Infamy Pearl Harbor
Countdown to Infamy

President Franklin Roosevelt called the Japanese surprise attack on December 7 “a date which will live in infamy.” Perhaps an even greater infamy was the vacuous form of liberalism that denied the existence of radical evil, making it almost incapable of distinguishing between flawed democracies and fascist barbarism.

Since the Iraq War President Donald Trump
Since the Iraq War

Let us hope President Trump will not follow the pattern of President Obama by overreacting to the Iraq War, while overlooking our best American foreign policy traditions.

Hacksaw Ridge
Because Courage Comes in Different Kinds

A review of Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge

Lost Cause: The American Christians of North Korea in the Second World War
Lost Cause: The American Christians of North Korea in the Second World War

During WWII, children of the American Christian missionaries in Korea served in significant roles in the U.S. government and sought to direct U.S. attention and efforts toward Korea.

Churchill FDR Atlantic Charter
Churchill, FDR, and the Atlantic Charter

Nearly two years after the start of the Second World War—with most of continental Europe under German occupation—Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill held their first wartime meeting, where they drafted the Atlantic Charter.

D-Day
When History Tipped toward Freedom

It was a day, in the words of President Franklin Roosevelt, when “the pride of our nation” began a battle…

The Next President Should Outline the Real Lessons of Hiroshima from Pearl Harbor
The Next President Should Outline the Real Lessons of Hiroshima from Pearl Harbor

It’s a good exercise for world leaders to remember those horrific bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and to learn critical lessons from them. But the President and I disagree on the lessons to be learned.

America First
Donald Trump & His America First Foreign Policy Approach

In this first part of a two-part series, Gayle Trotter interviewed Bret Stephens about Trump’s use of the “America First” slogan.

A Sad Speech

In his remarks at Hiroshima, President Obama avoided delivering an outright apology for America’s use of atomic bombs to finally break the brutal war machine of Imperial Japan—a decision that won and ended a just war. Even so, the speech raises three unsettling issues.